SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – A proposed bill in the State Capitol would require California universities and state schools to offer students abortion pills.

Senator Connie Leyva said Berkley students actually proposed the issue first and when they were denied it prompted her to step up for California schools.

However, critics of the bill don’t agree including one Sac State grad.

Six years ago Jessica Massey made a tough decision.

“Ultimately I chose life. it was the best thing I have ever done,” said Massey.

She regretfully said it wasn’t the first time. She had an abortion her junior year and it nearly ruined her.

“I know that hurt and pain that I was going through, I wanted to help women not make the same mistake,” Massey said.

Massey not only graduated but went on to get her masters degree and start a family. Now, she hopes to empower women to make similar choices.

“Stephan was just three months. Actually walked across the stage with him,” she said about having her now 6-year-old son.

She says allowing doctors at her school or any university to prescribe the abortion pill would make the process for young women too easy.

“They are not able to think about what you’re really doing,” she said.

The proposed drug is a chemical abortion pill that would end a pregnancy but must be taken within the first 10 weeks.

“It’s important. It’s important for women to have that option,” said Senator Connie Leyva.

She proposed Senate Bill 320 which would require California Universities and state schools to offer abortion pills.

“It’s a constitutionally protected right. I want to make sure students in college have access to this if they so choose to have an abortion and this is a safe way to do it,” Leyva said.

Doctors have testified the drug had little to no serious adverse effects for the mother.

Sacramento State students we talked to see both sides.

“That’s a right to women that they should be able to have control over their body and it’s even nicer that we have our campus to support us,” said Chantal Castro.

The bill will go before the Senate Education Committee on Wednesday.