RANCHO CORDOVA (CBS13) – Not a day goes by where Vlad Skots doesn’t think about his family in Ukraine.

Instead of fleeing to safety in Northern California, they chose to stay and fight. The decision left him feeling torn.

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“One side, I’m kind of proud of them,” Skots said.

On the other hand, he’s saddened.

Miles away from the frontlines, his group — the Ukrainian American House — is sending humanitarian aid. But he, like so many, believes more can be done.

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy pleaded with Congress and President Joe Biden Wednesday to support a NATO-enforced no-fly zone over his country. He also asked for more military might by providing more air-defense support.

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“I’m almost 45 years old. Today, my age stopped when the hearts of more than 100 children stopped beating,” said the Ukrainian leader.

But it wasn’t just a plea for more aid says Nova Ukraine, another humanitarian aid group based in Northern California.

“I think it was very effective,” said Igor Markov, the organization’s director. “I think the selection of the material and the rhetoric, and the delivery were perfect.”

In the speech, the Ukrainian president touched on major events and cultural idioms from U.S. history. Following standing ovations from U.S. lawmakers, President Biden announced an $800 million military package, but it didn’t include President Zelenskyy’s requests for fighter jets.

As Skots watched both addresses, he remained grateful for the military aid. Though, he was disappointed in what he believes was a missed opportunity.

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“I believe that the United States has a moral imperative to help Ukraine,” he said.