CBS Local — A new report is shedding more light on what dangerous chemicals are inside e-cigarettes. According to scientists in California, vaping is exposing teens to “potentially cancer-causing chemicals also found in tobacco cigarettes.”

A study done by researchers at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) has revealed that teens using e-cigarettes are inhaling at least eight different toxic compounds into their bodies while vaping. “Teenagers need to be warned that the vapor produced by e-cigarettes is not harmless water vapor, but actually contains some of the same toxic chemicals found in smoke from traditional cigarettes,” UCSF professor of pediatrics Dr. Mark Rubinstein said in a press release.

The UCSF examined the urine samples of over 100 teens who had an average age of 16. Sixty-seven of the patients used e-cigarettes, 17 used both tobacco and e-cigarettes, and 20 of the teens didn’t smoke at all. While teens who were using both had the highest levels of toxins in their urine, the study found that the 67 e-cigarette users had three times the amount of harmful compounds in their body than non-smokers.

“While they may be beneficial to adults as a form of harm reduction, kids should not be using them at all,” Dr. Rubinstein warned. The results, published in Pediatrics, disputes the marketing by e-cigarette producers which advertises vaping as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco.

Other recent studies support UCSF’s findings including a Feb. 21 report which found toxic levels of both lead and arsenic in e-cigarette vapors. Both reports concluded that the chemicals were created when e-cigarette liquids were heated by the device. The vaporization process is believed to “produce toxic substances that are potentially carcinogenic.”

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